The Educational CyberPlayGround Educational CyberPlayGround

 

Learn how to submit your song to NCFR online Repository of songs.

DEAR READER: THIS IS TOTALLY OPTIONAL AND NOT REQUIRED

Song Catching Worksheet

  1. What is the name of a childhood song that you learned from someone else?
  2. What are the lyrics to the first verse of the song?
  3. Is the song sung in English or another language?
  4. Are there gestures or movements to go with the song?
  5. Have you changed the song since you learned it? If "yes," how?
  6. When, where, with whom, and how often do you sing the song? Is it on an ordinary or special occasion?
  7. Describe who taught you the song.
  8. If you could teach the song to someone, who would it be, and why?
  9. Do you share any songs with other students at your school? Describe. Are there movements you do to the song?
  10. What music is shared only between girls? Only between boys? Describe differences that you see.

Adapted from www.louisianavoices.org.

* Warning Bawdy Song & Policy

1) YOU HAVE RECORDED YOUR MUSIC AND IT IS ON YOUR COMPUTER.

2) SELECT AND COPY EVERYTHING BELOW AND PASTE IT INTO YOUR EMAIL AND FILL IN YOUR ANSWERS

3) THEN ATTACH YOUR MUSIC FILE TO YOUR EMAIL

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*Personal Information is Optional and you will not be personally identifiable.

* Your Name{s}
* Teacher's Name
* Teacher e-mail
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SELECT AND COPY EVERYTHING BELOW AND PASTE IT INTO YOUR EMAIL AND FILL IN YOUR ANSWERS

Name of Your Song or Chant:

Your State:

Your Town + zip code:

Your Grade:

Your Age{s}:

Date Submitted:

Where Are You? Name of Place:

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By submitting your contribution The Educational CyberPlayGroundTM your Voice, Speech, Chant, or Song will be made available on the Educational CyberPlayground TM database. All data collected in this study will be confidential; all personal - identifiable data will be coded so that you cannot be identified.

Your participation is voluntary. The personal benefits for participating include knowing that your sample may help linguistic and ethnomusicology researchers in their investigations of children's music, song, speech, accent, and may provide some accent exposure to language teachers, music teachers, students, actors, and engineers who work with language and speech.

There is no payment for your participation. Our purpose is to give everyone including students the opportunity of integrating literacy, music, and technology into your life and into the K12 classroom while offering students an online project where they can have fun and learn more by using music and computers while they build the nations' archive.

This study is being conducted to research CHILDREN'S INDIGENOUS PLAYGROUND POETRY.

PERMISSION GRANTED
When you contribute your submission to the Educational CyberPlayGround TM you are giving permission to the Educational CyberPlayGround to reproduce without payment or other compensation the VOICE, SPEECH, CHANT, OR SONG submitted or collected by any participant for any projects which may be published by Educational CyberPlayGround TM Inc. and/or its licensees in the U.S. and worldwide.

All underage participants we know you can not grant permission cause you are underagel. No third party has or will have any claim to or interest in your submission as author or otherwise. No transfer of ownership in the submission is effected by non copyrightable public domain submissions.
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Educational CyberPlayGround TM
Gulph MIlls, PA 19428
Study is being conducted by the Educational CyberPlayGround.
Contact us regarding any questions or comments regarding your rights as a participant in this research.

Encouraging public awareness, understanding, and appreciation of folk arts traditions through creation of an online archive for recording and preserving community-based traditions by honoring individual unknown cultural makers and the artistry of our nation's children.

P.L. 94-201, The American Folklife Preservation Act of 1976 (20 USC 2101), which created the American Folklife Center, states the following: http://lcweb.loc.gov/folklife/teachers.html

That the diversity inherent in American folklife has contributed greatly to the cultural richness of the Nation and has fostered a sense of individuality and identity among the American people; . . .
[and] that it is in the interest of the general welfare of the Nation to preserve, support, revitalize, and disseminate American folklife traditions and arts. . . .
The term "American folklife" means the traditional expressive culture shared within the various groups in the United States: familial, ethnic, occupational, religious, regional; expressive culture includes a wide range of creative and symbolic forms such as custom, belief, technical skill, language, literature, art, architecture, music, play, dance, drama, ritual, pageantry, handicraft; these expressions are mainly learned orally, by imitation, or in performance, and are generally maintained without benefit of formal instruction or institutional direction.

THE AMERICAN FOLKLIFE CENTER
The American Folklife Center was established in 1976 by a Title 20 Education Act, the American Folklife Preservation Act (P.L. 94-201). It is a small and versatile organization designed to operate in cooperation with other federal state and local agencies and organizations and to initiate independent programs using its own resources. It is mandated by Congress to engage in a broad range of educational and research activities that preserve, revitalize, and present America's rich and diverse cultural heritage --a heritage associated with ethnic, regional, and occupational cultures.

Bawdy Song Policy

One person's bawdry is another person's innocence. A clear definition of what constitutes Bawdry: Is a song that exists to talk about sex, as opposed to a song that exists to talk about something else. An example is a song about attempted rape -- but it's not a bawdy song, because the point is how the women saves herself, not a catalog of what the rapist attempted to do. Bawdy Song Census

""The Foggy, Foggy Dew" was regarded as only semi-printable until the 1950s.  Burl Ives was jailed in Utah for singing it in public around 1940.

Teach your songs in Context. You have to make connections between "disciplines."

Wash your
mouth out
with soap.

Explicit Lyrics Policy: Freedom of expression is to be encouraged and protected. Sexually explicit and Bawdy songs lyrics have always been an integral part of children's rhymes and folk music. We do collect submissions with dirty words. and you'll find dirty ditties if you do a keyword search of our database for bawdy. If you're going to post something spicy and think you should label it, that's fine - but there is no requirement for labeling here and visitors are advised that they read at their own risk.If we can help people learn to explore life on their own and to think for themselves, we've taught them a valuable lesson. Material intended for a mature audience, may irritate parents of children under the age of sixteen. Keep this in mind, if they don't understand it, it's not really much of a problem, and if they do understand it, they didn't learn it from the NCFR project.
©1997 Educational CyberPlayGround, Inc.™ All rights reserved world wide.