LEARN AND TEACH ABOUT THE CULTURE OF HATE -
IT'S HISTORY AND SOLUTIONS.

TEACHING TOLERANCE WITH SONGS AND BOOKS. 
Many of the Hate songs being sung by "folk groups" at "folk music events" show the Intersection between Cultural Identity and Racist Ideology.

TEACH ABOUT CHARACTER THROUGH HISTORY
TEACH RESPECT AND TOLERANCE SONGS

Teach Kind Free classroom materials and humane education resources from various nonprofit organizations and ideas on how to implement humane education in the classroom

International Institute for Humane Education, which provides training and resources for teachers and others.

National Association for Humane and Environmental Education, the youth education affiliate of The Humane Society of the United States

Elementary curriculum that introduces students to the amazing lives and feelings of animals, discusses our society's changing perspectives on animals, and describes compassionate choices that students can make to help animals every day.

Just Choices encourages students to explore new ideas and reevaluate old ones while developing a strong understanding and appreciation of historical and contemporary social justice movements. Through this program, students will learn how their everyday choices affect others in society and will be inspired to take on issues with passionate civic engagement. Humane education encourages students to make the connection between the environmental, animal protection, and human rights movements and other social justice movements. It inspires students to live examined, intentional lives so that what they do today helps the planet, animals, and all people tomorrow.
Below is a list of sites that promote humane education and offer classroom resources to encourage critical thinking while empowering students to make a difference.

"I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy. My sons ought to study matematics and philosphy, geography, natual history and naval architecture, navigation, commerce, and agriculture, in order to give their children a right to study painting, poetry, music, architecture . . . . ." -- This was written in a letter to Abigail Adams from John Adams on May 12, 1780.

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